what is the difference between speech and language

What’s the Difference Between Speech and Language?

(Last Updated On: July 1, 2022)

Speech and Language

At its most basic, speech is communication that uses spoken language, and language is communication that uses either spoken or written language. In general, speech refers to spoken language, whereas language can include both speech and written language. Sometimes speech and language are used interchangeably, but it’s essential to understand their specific meanings to avoid confusion and misinterpretation. Here’s what the difference between speech and language is.

What is Language?

Language is a system of symbols and rules that allow us to communicate with each other. It is made up of spoken sounds, written symbols, and gestures. There are thousands of different languages worldwide, each with its unique history and structure. Language is important because it allows us to share our ideas and thoughts with others. It is a tool that we use to interact with the world around us. Language is also constantly changing, evolving, and adapting to the needs of its users.

Language is made up of spoken sounds, written symbols, and gestures. Spoken language is made up of sounds produced by the vocal cords and mouth. Written language is made up of symbols that are used to represent spoken language. Gestures are nonverbal movements that can be used to communicate.

Language is constantly changing, evolving, and adapting to the needs of its users. It is a living thing that is continuously in flux. New words are created, and old words change their meaning. Language is also influenced by the people who use it. The way we use language reflects our identity, culture, and values.

developement language and speech

What is Speech?

Speech is the vocalized form of human communication. It is based on the production of sounds with the mouth, which is then interpreted by the listener. The ability to produce speech is unique to humans, and it is an integral part of our cognitive abilities.

There are three main aspects of speech:

1. The physical production of sounds

2. The use of language

3. The ability to communicate

The physical production of sounds is based on the anatomy of the human vocal tract. The vocal tract includes the mouth, nose, and throat. The speech sounds are produced by the movement of air through the vocal tract. The use of language is based on the ability to understand and use symbols.

Language is a system of symbols that are used to communicate meaning. The symbols of language can be spoken, written, or signed.

The ability to communicate is based on the ability to interact with others. Communication is the process of exchanging information. It is a two-way process that involves both the sender and the receiver.

How does Speech Work?

Speech is an essential part of communication. It is how we share our thoughts and ideas with others. But have you ever wondered how speech works? There are three main components to speech: the respiratory system, the vocal cords, and the articulators. The respiratory system provides the air needed for speech. The vocal cords produce the sound of the voice. And the articulators shape the sound into words.

The respiratory system is made up of the lungs and the diaphragm. The lungs are where the air is stored. The diaphragm is a muscle that helps pump the air from the lungs. When we breathe in, the diaphragm contracts, and the lungs expand. This increases the air pressure in the lungs. When we breathe out, the diaphragm relaxes, and the lungs contract.

This decreases the air pressure in the lungs. The changes in air pressure are what cause the vocal cords to vibrate. The vocal cords are two thin bands of muscle located in the larynx, or voice box. When the air pressure from the lungs is high, the vocal cords are forced apart. When the air pressure from the lungs is low, the vocal cords are brought together.

The vocal cords vibrate at different rates to produce different sounds. The rate is determined by the air pressure from the lungs and the tension of the vocal cords. The vocal cords can have a wide range of sounds, from a low rumble to a high-pitched squeak.

But the sounds are not just determined by the vocal cords. The articulators also play a role. The articulators are the muscles and bones in the mouth and throat. They include the tongue, teeth, lips, and palate. The articulators help to shape the sound of the voice by changing the position of the mouth and throat.

The articulators can change the position of the mouth in three ways: by opening or closing the mouth, by raising or lowering the tongue, and by protruding or retracting the lips. The position of the articulators affects the sound of the voice in two ways. First, it determines the size of the opening through which the air will pass.

A small opening will produce a high-pitched sound, while a large opening will produce a low-pitched sound. Second, the position of the articulators affects the shape of the vocal tract. The vocal tract is the cavity between the vocal cords and the lips. The shape of the vocal tract determines the quality of the sound.

difference between- speech and language

Four Components of Speech

Speech is communication; it’s also a language, but one that differs from written or book language. In fact, speech has four components: phonology (pronunciation), syntax (basic grammar), semantics (meaning) and pragmatics (usefulness). Phonology is what we think of as word sounds — how words are said aloud. The syntax is our word order, or how we arrange words to communicate meaning. Semantics concerns our understanding of spoken words’ meanings. Pragmatics considers factors such as our tone of voice or gestures when we speak to other people in conversation.

All four components work together to make up what we call speech. For example, if you want to say I’m going, you might use your hand to emphasize going by pointing. That action would be considered part of your pragmatics. Or, you might say I’m going with an upward inflection at the end of your sentence — that would be regarded as part of your intonation and, therefore, part of your phonology.

It’s important to note that speech develops differently than language because children develop these skills at different times. Some children learn intonation first, while others learn grammar first; some will develop their ability to pronounce words before they can comprehend their meaning, while others will have no problem grasping what they mean right away.

Four Components of Language

Communication is a natural process that begins at birth. Communication includes both language and speech, which have different developmental trajectories. Both methods start as emotional connections before they develop into accurate communication skills. For example, an infant may cry to express distress if they aren’t receiving enough emotional support; however, once an emotional connection has been made with a caregiver, crying becomes a way of communicating hunger (speech) or discomfort (language).

Understanding what speech and language are—and how they differ—will help you better understand a child’s development. To get started, it helps to know four components of language: receptive language, expressive language, pragmatics, and social/pragmatic competence. Receptive language refers to understanding what others say. Expressive language refers to using words effectively in conversation. Pragmatics refers to understanding when and where certain things should be said or done.

Social/pragmatic competence refers to being able to communicate in appropriate ways in various social situations. If your child has autism spectrum disorder (ASD)/speech disorders, they might struggle with one or more of these components. Problems with pragmatic language are one of three main areas assessed by autism screening tests. It also causes a person difficulty in understanding and producing language.

Your child might also struggle to use words appropriately depending on who they are talking to and what situation they’re in. Stuttering is when a person cannot say sounds clearly, has a scratchy or raspy voice, repeats noises, or pauses when speaking. Speech sound disorders affect 8 to 9% of children.

For example, a person with ASD might use curse words around friends but never around parents, even though their parents allow cursing in their home. Or your child might speak more formally around adults than children even though his peers would expect him to speak informally among them. These challenges can make it difficult for people with ASD to interact socially because they don’t always understand what’s expected of them during conversations and interactions with other people. Do you know the top 10 languages with economic benefits?

The Main Differences Between Speech and Language

You may know that speech refers to verbal communication, and language refers to any communication method. But what are some of their specific differences? For example, do they both rely on semantics, or is one more cognitively complex than another? Fortunately, understanding these differences isn’t too tricky. Here are three main differences between speech and language.

(1) Speech has a broader definition than language does. Speech is generally defined as vocalized sounds used for communication. Language, however, has a much narrower definition: the words, their pronunciation, and how they’re combined into phrases and sentences. In other words, while all languages include vocalized sounds used for communication (i.e., speech), not all languages include written elements (i.e., writing).

(2) Different areas of your brain are involved in speech versus language processes. Regarding neuroanatomy—or what parts of your brain control what behaviors—speech relies primarily on Broca’s area and Wernicke’s area; language depends mainly on Broca’s area alone. Broca’s area is responsible for motor skills, including how you form words, whereas Wernicke’s is responsible for understanding written and spoken language.

(3) Finally, speech develops earlier than language does. When babies start making sounds, they’re practicing their speech skills; when they start combining sounds into words, they’re practicing their language skills. This isn’t to say that babies can’t understand or produce words before they start incorporating them into phrases or sentences; it just means that different aspects of communication develop at different rates in children. By age 2, for example, a child may be able to identify individual words but not yet be able to string them together meaningfully.

difference betweet speech language and communication speech and language
Do language and speech develop together?

It is a common misconception that language and speech develop together. In reality, they are two very different things. Language is the system of symbols and rules we use to communicate, while speech is the actual act of communication. While they are closely related, they develop separately. Here are three ways that language and speech develop differently.

One way that language and speech develop differently is in the order in which they develop. Language develops first, and speech develops second. This is because language is more complex than speech. It is made up of symbols and rules that we have to learn. Speech, on the other hand, is simply the act of communication. It does not require us to learn anything new.

Another way that language and speech develop differently is in the speed at which they develop. Language develops much slower than speech. This is because language is more complex than speech. It takes us longer to learn the symbols and rules of language. Speech, on the other hand, develops much faster. This is because it is simply the act of communication. We do not have to learn anything new.

Language and speech develop differently in the way they are used. Language is used to communicate abstract concepts. Speech, on the other hand, is used to communicate concrete ideas. This is because language is more complex than speech. It allows us to communicate concepts that are not easily expressed through speech.

Language Development vs. Cognitive Development

Speech and language development are tightly coupled. Language development is vital to speech because it allows us to give labels to objects, events, actions, etc. (the labels could be single words or even entire sentences). The label then helps with our speech by making it easier for us to communicate verbally what we want instead of using gestures or non-verbal communication. It also allows children who do not have perfect verbal skills an alternative way of expressing their needs/wants. Without these labels, children would be limited in what they can say and how they can say it.

This would make life much more difficult for them and others around them who may need to understand what they are trying to communicate. These labels help form a child’s vocabulary, which will continue to grow throughout their lives. Additionally, if you consider that your brain processes spoke language differently than written language, you begin to see why speech and language go hand in hand. For example, when you read a word on paper, your brain must process that information from left to right across each line of text.

However, when someone speaks to you (or vice versa), your brain must process that information from one ear at a time so that you can comprehend what is being said without missing any part of it. If your brain were to process what was being said in writing, you would miss out on some aspects of what was just said. So again, there is a strong connection between speech and language development.

speech versus language

You can have language without having speech.

It is often assumed that speech is necessary for language. However, this is not the case. Language can exist without speech. There are three main ways in which this can happen. One way language can exist without speech is through sign language. Sign language is a language that is communicated through hand/ body gestures and body language. It is used by people who are deaf or hard of hearing. It is a fully-fledged language with its grammar and syntax.

Another way language can exist without speech is through written language. Written language can be in the form of books, articles, or even just simple notes. It is a way of communicating that does not require speech. Language can also exist without speech through body language. Body language is a form of nonverbal communication. It can include things like facial expressions, hand gestures, and posture. It is a way of communicating that does not require speech.

Speech Therapy vs. Language Therapy

There are many different types of therapies that can be used to help children with speech and language difficulties. Two of the most common types of therapies are speech therapy and language therapy. Both speech therapy and language therapy can be effective in helping children improve their speech and language skills. However, there are some critical differences between the two types of therapies.

One key difference between speech therapy and language therapy is the focus of each type of therapy. Speech therapy focuses on improving a child’s ability to produce speech sounds. Language therapy, on the other hand, focuses on improving a child’s ability to understand and use language.

Another critical difference between speech therapy and language therapy is the setting in which each type of therapy is typically provided. Speech therapy is generally offered in one-on-one sessions with a speech therapist. Language therapy is typically provided in small groups with other children who have similar language difficulties.

Another critical difference between speech therapy and language therapy is the type of activities that are typically used in every kind of therapy. Speech therapy activities usually involve a lot of repetition and practice of speech sounds and words. Language therapy activities typically involve more conversation and interaction with other children.

FAQs

Is speech considered a language?

Many people believe speech is the same as language, but there is a big difference between the two. Language is a system of symbols and rules that are used to communicate, while speech is the actual act of sharing. So, while speech is a form of communication, it is not considered a language.

What is the difference between speech and language development?

The terms “speech” and “language” are often used interchangeably, but they refer to two different things. Speech development refers to the physical production of sounds, while language development involves understanding and manipulating words.

Can you have language without speech?

It is commonly believed that language and speech are the same. However, this is not always the case. While speech is undoubtedly a key component of language, it is possible to have language without speech. This can happen in several ways, such as when someone is deaf or when someone is using sign language. It is also possible for someone to know a language but not be able to speak it, as is often the case with children who are learning a second language. So, while speech is undoubtedly an essential part of language, it is not the only way to communicate.

Contact us now for any questions
No Comments

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.

payment icon
Request quote